Before You Buy That New Air Conditioner, Read This…

By: Brian Schutt  |  May 23, 2012

When the weather gets hot, air conditioners break.  The hotter it gets, the more stress on your A/C, means more potential issues.  But, unless you can tell the difference between a capacitor, a contactor and a compressor, how are you going to provide any accountability to the heating and cooling company that’s telling you it’s time for a new system? The bottom line is, you can’t.  Once it’s replaced, all evidence of either willful or ignorant coercion is gone. And all you have is a working system.

You’re under duress.  It’s hot, your kids or significant other are complaining. You just want the situation fixed. There are many companies that have no problem taking advantage of you.  That bears repeating, these companies know that you’ll do whatever it takes, so they are perfectly willing to sell you the most expensive thing possible.

Before you buy, know these things about your system.  If it doesn’t cross every one of these tests, you absolutely need to call another heating and cooling company.

  • The average life expectancy of an air conditioner is 15 years. Systems can and do need replacement before then, but if it’s less, why not get a second opinion
  • Is the fan blowing on the outside unit? If the answer is yes, the repair is very likely not a major one.  Warm air inside does not mean your system is completely broken.
  • Did they say your compressor has failed?  Ask them if they have tried a hard start kit. This can add a few years to the life of your compressor.
Bottom line, we follow up many companies who are plain and simply trying to take advantage of homeowners.  We don’t. You may not use us, but we will be honest 100% of the time.  Give us a shout at 317.670.0171.

Before you sign on the dotted line

Brian Schutt

About 

is the co-owner of Homesense Heating | Cooling. Born and raised in Indianapolis, he loves the city and its people, and is committed to bringing a servants mindset into the heating and cooling industry. One of the ways he does that is to translate the technical language of HVAC into the manageable and understandable for homeowners.

Have a question? Tweet him and you'll get an answer promptly.

Posted in: Air Conditioning